Mixed Connective Tissue Disease

Mixed Connective Tissue Disease

What is Mixed Connective Tissue Disease?

Mixed Connective Tissue Disease is also known as Overlap Syndrome because it contains a combination or overlap of clinical symptoms that are typically seen in diseases such as Systemic Sclerosis, Lupus, and Inflammatory Myositis.

What are the symptoms of Mixed Connective Tissue Disease?

Many patients with this disease have an overlap of signs and symptoms resembling other rheumatic diseases such as an Inflammatory Arthritis, Sausage Digits, Raynaud’s Phenomenon, Thickening or Hardening of the Skin, Difficulty Swallowing, Interstitial Lung Disease, Pericarditis as well as Muscle Inflammation and Weakness.

How is Mixed Connective Tissue Disease diagnosed?

A thorough history and careful Physical Exam will determine the different signs and symptoms associated with this condition. However, patients with Mixed Connective Tissue Disease are uniformly positive for the lab test known as ANA and have high titers of U1–RNP.

How is Mixed Connective Tissue Disease treated?

Patients with Mixed Connective Tissue Disease should be treated according to the symptoms or presenting features. Many are treated with Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs). However, management may be dictated by which is the more serious or prevalent manifestation of this condition.